So, You Want to Buy A Car. Part 1

Maybe today’s the day. You’ve finally reached that point. Maybe it’s an issue with your current ride. Maybe there’s a new addition (driver/member) to your family. Or maybe it’s just time for a change. Whatever your reason, your about to venture into a process that most people compare to dental work or a colonoscopy! But does it really have to be that bad?

As a long-term member of the second most hated group of professionals in America, ranked behind lawyers in most informal surveys, the car salesman is perhaps the most untrustworthy, despised individual in America today! We are all lifelong members of the Villains, Thieves and Scoundrels Union, Local 3 (thanks to those of you who got the Rocky & Bullwinkle reference). We would lie to our mothers for a sale, and nothing we say or do can be taken at face value. We will lie, cheat and steal to make a commission, so you best leave your wallet at home and prepare for war.

According to a recent study by Cox Automotive (by the way, they own Manheim, the auto auction where most dealers get their used cars from, as well as some of the best-known consumer websites including Dealer.com, Autotrader, Kelly Blue Book) 61% of consumers do not feel the shopping experience has improved! While many consumers start their journey to buying a vehicle on line, most end up in a dealership to complete their purchase.  Truth be told, I have bought one car in my lifetime entirely on-line, and the experience, while it saved me time and money, proved to be more time consuming when the vehicle I purchased (a convertible) showed up and malfunctioned (the top did not operate). It took me 3 months to resolve an $800 repair bill, and I vowed never again to do that.

So how can you make your car buying experience better?

Well, first, don’t expect to commit Grand Theft Auto. No dealership is willing to lose money to earn your business, so if you expect them to, be prepared for disappointment. Dealer and managers spend hours researching the prices of their units and realize that an unrealistic price will not attract any attention. Dealers tend to advertise their vehicles to be the lowest, or among the lowest priced in the market. At my dealership, we typically have the lowest price for a unit within 200 miles, and in some cases, in the entire United States.  Expecting to get thousands off an advertised price is unrealistic, and sometimes, downright insulting. We know the value of our inventory and making a ridiculously low offer on a vehicle could have you insulting the very person who bought it for the dealership in the first place!

Expect a dealership to make a profit on the goods and services. Regardless of what you do for a living, you would not do it if you could not make money doing it. Keep in mind that a typical dealerships has several people involved in selling you your new vehicle, from the porter who pulled it off the truck, to the mechanic who serviced it, the detailer who cleaned up, the sales rep who showed it to you, the sales manager who priced it right for you, the business manage who completed the paperwork, the billing clerk, who processes the paper work, the title clerk, who handles your registration and DMV work, and I’m sure I’ve forgotten someone in this list. So, you see, it’s a lot more involved then you think. That’s why dealerships need to turn a profit on a sale.

What about all those internet pundits who “expose” the secret money-making schemes that dealer employ to “rob” you? Most are folk that tried and couldn’t succeed at auto sales, or any sale for that matter. Where I once described sales as “the art of extracting money from another man’s pocket without resorting to violence”, I came to realize that sales is really about providing information and insight to individuals in order to earn their trust, respect and ultimately, their business. My job is to provide you with information and options to help you make the best decision you can, and if I do my job correctly, you are my customer for life, as well as my friend. Are there customers that I didn’t like but still sold them a vehicle? Absolutely! And how about the ones that I really hit it off with, but didn’t sell them? I still hear from many of them over the years, and some have even followed me from dealer to dealer over the course of my career.

Stay tuned for more insights.

Geoff Cohen

General Sales Manager

NEXCAR

 

 

 

 

Where's My Tax Refud?

WHEN TO EXPECT MY TAX REFUND? THE IRS TAX REFUND CALENDAR 2018-2019

 

One of the most pressing questions in the life of an early tax filer – when can I expect my tax refund to come? Before e-filing, this was always difficult to predict. First, you mail in your return. Then someone inputs all your information (and later, computers scanned in your information), then the Treasury had to issue a check, which was then mailed to you. Now, with a free IRS e-file, you can get your refund in as little as 8 days from when you file, if you elect for direct deposit.

For 9 out of 10 taxpayers, the IRS issued refunds in less than 21 days from the date the return was received last year.

The IRS announced that it will begin processing tax returns on January 28, 2019. However, many tax programs have not been fully completed to start filing due to the government shutdown. While the IRS will start processing returns, we do expect delays across the board.

2019 Tax Deadline: Monday, April 15, 2019.

The IRS does not release a calendar but continues to issue guidance that most filers should receive their refund within 21 days. They also remind filers that many tax software programs allow you to submit your taxes before the start of tax season. However, these software programs don't eFile until the IRS opens the system (with a few minor exceptions for testing). 

Also, you are legally allowed to mail in your 2018 tax return starting on January 1, 2019. However, if you mail in your return, you can expect to add 6-8 weeks to your processing time (at the low end).

Early Filers - You Will See A Delay In Your Refund

Congress passed a law last year that requires the IRS to HOLD all tax refunds that include the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) until February 15, 2019, regardless of how early the tax return was filed. So, if you file on the first day, you might still be waiting until February 15 for your refund.

The IRS released a note last year that people held up by this delay shouldn't expect their refunds until the week of February 25, assuming there are no other problems with the tax returns..

?The goal of this is to cut down on fraud and give the IRS time to ensure no duplicate returns are filed. The trouble is, the IRS will hold your entire tax refund, not just the EITC or ACTC part.

When you get your refund, don't let it go to waste! Make sure you put it in a high yield savings account ASAP!

2019 IRS Refund Schedule Chart

Here is a chart of when you can expect your tax refund for when the return was accepted (based on e-Filing). This is an estimate based on past years trends, but based on early information, does seem accurate for about 90% of taxpayers. Also, as always, you can use the link after the calendar to get your specific refund status. 

Now, when to expect my tax refund!

2019 IRS Tax Refund Calendar

Date Accepted

Direct Deposit Sent

Paper Check Mailed

Jan 28 - Feb 2, 2019

Feb 15, 2019

Feb 22, 2019

Feb 3 - Feb 9, 2019

Feb 22, 2019

Mar 1, 2019

Feb 10 - Feb 16, 2019

Mar 1, 2019

Mar 8, 2019

Feb 17 - Feb 23, 2019

Mar 8, 2019

Mar 15, 2019

Feb 24 - Mar 2, 2019

Mar 15, 2019

Mar 22, 2019

Mar 3 - Mar 9, 2019

Mar 22, 2019

Mar 29, 2019

Mar 10 - Mar 16, 2019

Mar 29, 2019

Apr 5, 2019

Mar 17 - Mar 23, 2019

Apr 5, 2019

Apr 12, 2019

Mar 24 - Mar 30, 2019

Apr 12, 2019

Apr 19, 2019

Mar 31 - Apr 6, 2019

Apr 19, 2019

April 26, 2019

Apr 7 - Apr 13, 2019

April 26, 2019

May 3, 2019

Apr 14 - Apr 20, 2019

May 3, 2019

May 10, 2019

Apr 21 - Apr 27, 2019

May 10, 2019

May 17, 2019

Apr 28 - May 4, 2019

May 17, 2019

May 24, 2019

If, for some reason, you didn’t receive your return in the time specified above, give or take a few days, you can always use the IRS’s tool called Get Refund Status. Since the link requires personal information, here is the non-html version: https://sa2.www4.irs.gov/irfof/lang/en/irfofgetstatus.jsp.

From: The College Investor - https://thecollegeinvestor.com/840/when-to-expect-my-tax-refund/

 

How often should you change the oil in your car?

 Do you know how often should you change the Oil in your car? It must be done every 3000 miles, did you know that? Make an appointment with us and get it done!








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